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Recommended Read: Mental health websites don't have to sell your data. Most still do.

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“In other words, whenever you visit a number of websites dedicated to mental health to read about depression or take a test, dozens of third-parties may receive this information and bid money to show you a targeted ad. Interestingly, some of these websites seem to include marketing trackers without displaying any ads, meaning they simply allow data collection on their site, which in turn may be used for advanced profiling of their users.

It is highly disturbing that we still have to have to say this, but websites dealing with such sensitive topics should not track their users for marketing purposes. Your mental health is not and should never be for sale.”

I went to add this article to the lens, then saw it goes on to recommend our tracker blocker, Better Blocker. Kismet!

Read the original post, 'Mental health websites don't have to sell your data. Most still do.'.

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chriswere
12 days ago
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Monmouth, Wales
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OpenShot Video Editor Gets a Major Update With Version 2.5 Release

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OpenShot is one of the best open-source video editors out there. With all the features that it offered – it was already a good video editor on Linux.

Now, with a major update to it (v.2.5.0), OpenShot has added a lot of new improvements and features. And, trust me, it’s not just any regular release – it is a huge release packed with features that you probably wanted for a very long time.

In this article, I will briefly mention the key changes involved in the latest release.

Openshot 2 5 0

OpenShot 2.5.0 Key Features

Here are some of the major new features and improvements in OpenShot 2.5:

Hardware Acceleration Support

The hardware acceleration support is still an experimental addition – however, it is a useful feature to have.

Instead of relying on your CPU to do all the hard work, you can utilize your GPU to encode/decode video data when working with MP4/H.264 video files.

This will affect (or improve) the performance of OpenShot in a meaningful way.

Support Importing/Exporting Files From Final Cut Pro & Premiere

Openshot Xml Edl

Final Cut Pro and Adobe Premiere are the two popular video editors for professional content creators. OpenShot 2.5 now allows you to work on projects created on these platforms. It can import (or export) the files from Final Cut Pro & Premiere in EDL & XML formats.

Thumbnail Generation Improved

This isn’t a big feature – but a necessary improvement to most of the video editors. You don’t want broken images in the thumbnails (your timeline/library). So, with this update, OpenShot now generates the thumbnails using a local HTTP server, can check multiple folder locations, and regenerate missing ones.

Blender 2.8+ Support

The new OpenShot release also supports the latest Blender (.blend) format – so it should come in handy if you’re using Blender as well.

Easily Recover Previous Saves & Improved Auto-backup

Openshot Recovery

It was always a horror to lose your timeline work after you accidentally deleted it – which was then auto-saved to overwrite your saved project.

Now, the auto-backup feature has improved with an added ability to easily recover your previous saved version of the project.

Even though you can recover your previous saves now – you will find a limited number of the saved versions, so you have to still remain careful.

Other Improvements

In addition to all the key highlights mentioned above, you will also notice a performance improvement when using the keyframe system.

Several other issues like SVG compatibility, exporting & modifying keyframe data, and resizable preview window have been fixed in this major update. For privacy-concerned users, OpenShot no longer sends usage data unless you opt-in to share it with them.

For more information, you can take a look at OpenShot’s official blog post to get the release notes.

Installing OpenShot 2.5 on Linux

You can simply download the .AppImage file from its official download page to install the latest OpenShot version. If you’re new to AppImage, you should also check out how to use AppImage on Linux to easily launch OpenShot.

Some distributions like Arch Linux may also provide the latest OpenShot release with regular system updates.

PPA available for Ubuntu-based distributions

On Ubuntu-based distributions, if you don’t want to use AppImage, you can use the official PPA from OpenShot:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:openshot.developers/ppa
sudo apt update
sudo apt install openshot-qt

You may want to know how to remove PPA if you want to uninstall it later.

Wrapping Up

With all the latest changes/improvements considered, do you see OpenShot as your primary video editor on Linux? If not, what more do you expect to see in OpenShot? Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below.

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chriswere
12 days ago
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Monmouth, Wales
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Dino is a Decent XMPP Client for Linux Desktops

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Dino is an open source XMPP client for Linux desktops. Written in GTK/Vala, Dino also supports end-to-end encryption, file sending, and message searching.

This post, Dino is a Decent XMPP Client for Linux Desktops, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

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chriswere
24 days ago
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Monmouth, Wales
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LibreOffice 6.4 Released, This is What’s New

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libreoffice releasedLibreOffice 6.4 is the latest stable release of the open source productivity suite and contains a number of new features and key improvements. The Document Foundation, the non-profit organisation who steer development of this free […]

This post, LibreOffice 6.4 Released, This is What’s New, was written by Joey Sneddon and first appeared on OMG! Ubuntu!.

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chriswere
25 days ago
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Monmouth, Wales
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What Amazon Kindle? Here’s an Open Source eBook Reader

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When it comes to an eBook reader, the choices are limited. The market is dominated by Amazon's proprietary Kindle along with a few other options like Kobo, Nook and Onyx.

An interesting news for open source enthusiasts is that a developer, Joey Castillo, is working on creating an open source eBook reader appropriately named Open Book.

Open Book: An open source eBook reader

Open Book Under Development eBook reader

The Open Book aims to be a simple ‘open’ device that “anyone with a soldering iron can build for themselves”.

It’s hackable so if you are into DIY stuff and you have some knowledge, you may tweak it to your liking. For example, Joey use TensorFlow Lite to give voice commands for flipping the pages on Open Book. You can do things like this on your own on this open hardware device.

If that kind of scares you because you are not really into tinkering with hardware, I have a good news for you. Open Book was named winner of Hackaday’s Take Flight with Feather contest!

This means that when the hardware is ready, you should be able to purchase it from DigiKey. You should be able to fit the device as an eBook reader or experiment with it, if you feel like doing it.

It kind of reminds me of Game Shell, a single board computer based retro gaming console that could be tinkered into many other things.

Open Book specifications

Open Book Board

There are two versions of Open Book: Open Book Feather and E-Book Feather Wing. The eBook wing does less than the Open Book Feather, mainly because it’s limited to using only the pins available via the Feather header.

You may guess from the name that the project uses Adafruit’s Feather development boards.

Here are the main specifications for the Open Book (both versions):

  • 4.2 inch, 400 x 300 pixel ePaper display
  • SAMD51 ARM Cortex-M4 32-bit processor
  • 7 buttons for navigation (directional pad, select button and page turn buttons)
  • status LED lights
  • A microSD card reader
  • Headphone jack

The display seems a bit small, isn’t it?

Open Book release, pricing and availability

Open Book Demo

Open Book is the winner of Take Flight with Feather competition by Hackaday. This means that at least 100 Open Book boards will be manufactured and made available for purchase.

Liliputing noted that Adafruit will be handling the manufacturing, and Digi-Key will eventually be selling Open Book boards.

At this point, it’s not clear how much will it cost and exactly when it will be available.

Remember that it’s an open source project. You can find all the circuit designs, source code on its GitHub page and if you have the skills, get the required hardware components and build an Open Book on your own.

Otherwise, wait for a couple of months (hopefully) for the release of the Open Book boards and then go about experimenting with the device.

If you like the project and want to support it, you can help Joey on Pateron. You can follow the updates on the Open Book on the Patreon page, Joey’s mailing list or Joey’s Twitter account.

Do you think the project has potential? Would you buy one when it is available? What do you think of it?

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hexdsl
24 days ago
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/home/hexdsl
chriswere
26 days ago
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Monmouth, Wales
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Abandoning your family made easy

2 Comments and 5 Shares

Abandoning your family made easy

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chriswere
30 days ago
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Monmouth, Wales
hexdsl
39 days ago
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/home/hexdsl
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2 public comments
fxer
40 days ago
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w/ THX sound
Bend, Oregon
ChrisDL
40 days ago
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A++
New York
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